Southampton: Dangerous, unsupported bricks

 

The following observations were made during a full structural survey (no know as a ‘Building Survey’) carried out on this 1950’s property near Southampton

The external walls of the house were examined and noted to be 265mm thick cavity walling with fletton facing bricks to the outer leaf.

The inner leaf was probably of blockwork. The front bay is faced with brickwork to the lower storey and is clad with plain concrete tiles between the windows. The surveyor examined the walls as far as possible to assess their condition and state of repair.

The walls appear to be in satisfactory structural condition with no major cracks or bulges evident but there is a crack in the flank wall between the side door opening and the window to the landing.

The crack was due to thermal movement in the length of the flank wall. As the wall is relatively, long, thermal movement will be concentrated at the weakest point which is between the two openings. The crack should be raked out and repointed with mortar containing lime to avoid further cracking.

Deflection of door frame potentially dangerous

The soldier course of bricks above the side entrance door frame was loose.

When the door frame was replaced, the bricks became loose as they were supported by the door frame.

The bricks are causing deflection to the frame which is not strong enough to support the weight.

The buyer was therefore recommend to have the loose bricks are carefully removed, fit a supporting metal bar across the opening and the bricks reinstated.

If left then the situation could worsen leaving the structure in a compromised state.

Post Author: Frances Traynor