Historic woodworm no cause for concern

During a recent building survey, the surveyor noted evidence of historic woodworm (photograph shows flight holes within the front structural purlin within the left hand roof void).

The extent of the wood worm was entirely consistent with buildings of this age and it would have been highly unusual not to have seen signs of any activity at all.

However, there was no evidence that this was active and the surveyor assumed that all of the original timbers were treated as part of the original conversion. 

When buying a property, your solicitor should confirm that the timbers have been treated for woodworm, which should have been undertaken as part of the conversion works, and the existence of any guarantees in relation to this. 

 The existing roof timbers, where visible, appeared to be free from dry/wet rot and in a sound structural condition.  

 Due to obvious access restrictions we were unable to undertake a thorough inspection of the main roof externally but from what we were able to determine from ground level, and from a partial internal inspection, we did not note any signs of “sagging” or deflection and as such it appears that the structural timbers comprising the main roof structure are in a sound structural condition and as such no remedial/strengthening works are deemed to be required as part of any other recommended works. 

Post Author: Frances Traynor