MPs call for more guidance on dealing with Japanese knotweed

More information is to be made available on dealing with Japanese knotweed, the invasive plant that can cause serious issues in property.

A Parliamentary inquiry has recently been held into the presence of the non-native plant with the Science and Technology Committee asking for greater detail and guidance on dealing with knotweed.

Free download offers information

While that guidance is being prepared, the national trade body, PCA, is making its Invasive Weed Control Document Library available for free download for conveyancing solicitors who require background on the issue.

The library includes guidance notes, information leaflets and a Code of Practice for how to proceed when Japanese knotweed is found to be present in a property’s environs.

Chartered surveyors who are members of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) follow its guidance on how to deal with Japanese knotweed when carrying out building surveys for conveyancing purposes. Surveyor Local only works with RICS chartered surveyors in the surveys we offer.

Positive outcome

PCA chief executive Steve Hodgson was among the industry representatives who gave evidence to the Parliamentary committee in its one-off oral evidence session in January.

He said: “The outcome of all this will hopefully be positive. It is anticipated that RICS will try and draw people together for the common task of revising their seminal Information Paper on Japanese knotweed.

“This is a process we are very keen to be part of and one that will be supported by PCA and its members. In the meantime, we will continue to curate a range of information, produced by industry experts and academics, to help provide guidance on the plant, and other non-native species.”

The Parliamentary session was convened to look at all the issues surrounding Japanese knotweed, including the latest scientific evidence on its effects on the UK’s build environment and how it affects mortgage lending and property valuations.

The PCA information can be downloaded here.

Post Author: Frances Traynor